Academic Writing: Or, How to Avoid Being Sick Over Your Laptop

My writing process is thus:

1: Vomit words on a page.
2: Leave it for two weeks.
3: Re-write everything.

Or, as my friend Erik Östling puts it, the old “puke and revise” method.

Much of academic writing is taking two separate ideas and merging them together. A basic formula could be: here’s this one dudette’s theory on something religion-related, and here’s this religious group behaving in ways I find interesting, so my job is to see what is gained or lost by applying this theory to the practice. Does it fit well? Why or why not? What insights can we glean from the group’s practice? How could the theory be revised? Etc.

It’s simple enough. Good scholarship does this kind of thing seamlessly.

The problem, is that academics are rarely marrying just two ideas (that’s for undergrads [P.S.: I love teaching undergrads.]), but are instead trying to present a seamless disscussing on one topic by weaving in multiple theories, discourses, and ideas in a way that does not leave the reader confused, angry, and unwilling to fund, publish, and work with you.

I am obsessive. Before beginning to write I collect mass amounts of data before I get a clear idea of what it is I am actually trying to do, overwhelming the issue and confusing myself for days, before I finally streamline my thoughts. The eventual clarity is a glorious euphoria: Oh this is what my paper’s about!!!

The current problem under review: how do you write a thesis proposal on the Church of Satan, which incorporates two separate fields of study, western esotericism, and media/material culture studies? That is, how do I look at the material culture of these Satanists in a way that corresponds to similar studies on magical groups, without the study reading as disjointed?

For those unfamiliar, it is somewhat rare to study contemporary ritual/magical groups in terms of material culture. First, because modern magicians simply are not as studied, and second, because when they are, they are usually studied under the rubric of western esotericism (not material culture).

There is always overlap between fields. The issue, is that when you go cross-disciplinary, your methodology requires refining to adapt to the tug-and-pull of different disciplines, in a way that benefits the particular study best. The proposal I put together at the beginning of my doctorate is no longer completely relevant, as I’ve refined my approach. It’s now time to put it all together.

That’s where I’m at. I’m not yet certain how to do this. And I have a thesis proposal (over)due.

Lucky for me I can vomit on my blog.

3 thoughts on “Academic Writing: Or, How to Avoid Being Sick Over Your Laptop

  1. My favourite thing (read: not favourite thing) is finally finding that seamless discussion of multiple (often not-agreeing-with-each-other-because-colonization) theories/disciplines that makes a logical and fantastic argument that you feel confident in. Then sending the aforementioned chapter/article/etc… to supervisor/committee member/peer reviewer for them to come back and demand that you insert [topic-du-jour/their research interests] because it would “fit with your research” and would “open up many possibilities to explore” (as if my 75 page draft doesn’t already need to be cut down, right?).

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Puke and revise! Totally stealing that phrasing, because that’s what I do, it’s what I have always done since way before the internet was a thing and I’d sit there using Windows95 to write things in Word! I just write and write and write, whatever comes to mind on the topic I’m working on. Then leave it. Just walk away. Let it sit. Then go back and edit grammar and spelling, take stuff out, add stuff in, rearrange things. Yep, that’s me. Excellent :)

    Liked by 1 person

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